fbpx

Can I Use a Backup Camera for a Driver's Test?

You can use a backup camera for driver's test!

 


Can I Use a Backup Camera for a Driver's Test?

https://youtu.be/BEJED-3Swzw


Closed Caption

Introduction

- Hi there, smart drivers, Rick with Smart Drive Test talking to you today about backup cameras in newer vehicles.

Can you use 'em for a driving test? Short answer's no.

The long answer is yes.

Stick around, I'll be right back with that information.

You can use a backup camera for your driver's test, but not as your main line of sight when reversing. Glance at it the way you would your mirrors.

Hi there, smart drivers.

Talking to you today about backup cameras.

Most newer vehicles in the last 10 years are going to have backup cameras fitted to them as the 2018 legislation came into effect that mandated that they had to be put on all new vehicles after that year, both in Canada and the United States.

Your backup camera's going to come on as soon as you put the vehicle into reverse, and you can use it for a driving test.

Not that you can't look at it.

You simply can't use it as your primary line of sight.

For the duration of your back, you have to be hand over the passenger vehicle if you can get it over there.

If not, if you're in a bigger vehicle, just in the middle and looking out the rear window.

When reversing for a driver's test, you must look out the rear window of the vehicle. Stop every vehicle length to do a 360° scan and check mirrors and backup camera.

But, for every vehicle length that you back up, stop, pause the vehicle, check your mirrors, and check your backup camera because the backup camera will give you a line of sight into the biggest blind area on your vehicle.

The larger the blind area to the rear of the vehicle.

So, use the backup camera but don't use it as your primary line of sight.

You can glance at it, and then look out the rear window for the duration of your backing.

Automotive Safety Legislation

Now, backup cameras came into effect because of legislation in the United States.

Dr. Greg Gulbransen in 2002 backed up in his driveway and killed his two year old son.

Absolutely horrible story.

But he lobbied government to pass legislation.

It took a long time to get the legislation in place.

But they claim that in the United States, there's approximately 200 deaths a year, backup deaths because of automobiles.

Half of those are children under the age of five and elderly people over the age of 70.

And that these backup cameras reduce crashes and fatalities by up to 17%.

So they are effective in doing what they do because they give you a line of sight into the biggest blind area on your vehicle.

So do use them.

Do glance at them for the purpose of your driver's test.

Half of all backing fatalities are children under the age of five, and the elderly over seventy. Backup cameras reduce backing crashes.

State of New Jersey Allows Backup Cameras

And at this juncture, the only state that I know of that allows you to use the backup camera primarily for your line of sight is the state of New Jersey.

Every other place, every other jurisdiction in both the United States and Canada, and in the world for that matter, doesn't let you use the backup camera just for reversing.

You have to use, look out the rear window for the duration of backing.

Check up in the corner here, check the card out, and it'll have a complete video on how to reverse.

On most vehicles, the blind area to the rear of the vehicle is the biggest.

Question for my smart drivers:

Do you have a backup camera in the car that you're using for the purposes of your driver's test?

Leave a comment down in the comments section there.

All of that helps out the Smart Drivers.

For another video, click here.

To subscribe, click here.

And remember, pick the best answer, not necessarily the right answer.

Have a great day! Bye now.