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OBSOLETE

You must know what a manual front wheel limiting valve is for your CDL air brake test. These are no longer found on modern trucks.To reduce application pressure to the steering axle by 50 % compared to the drive axle brakes, when required by reduced road conditions (rain, snow or ice).

The system consists of a dash switch with 2 positions:

Dry Road: 100% front wheel braking; in other words, all brakes apply equally.

Slippery Road: reduces braking force to the front brakes by (50%) when in the slippery position.

MUST KNOW

The brake pedal applies the service brakes - truck, or truck and trailer brakes.

In other words, the brake pedal brings the vehicle to a stop when it it depressed.

SHOULD KNOW

The foot valve operates the secondary and primary sub systems simultaneously.

Failure in one part of the dual air system does not affect the operation of the other, owing to the division of the braking system into two independent subsystems.

The brake pedal valve is also a self-balancing valve.

If there is a 10psi (69kPa) brake application made, and a slight leak exist in one part of the system that causes a reduction in the 10psi brake application, the foot valve will reopen and top up the air pressure that part of the system.

In other words, even if there is a leak, the foot valve and other valves will compensate for this by maintaining a 10psi brake application pressure.

COULD KNOW

The brake pedal is a valve. It is called either the foot valve or the treadle valve.

Learn about the parking brake here!


Air Brakes Simply Explained is a comprehensive manual that guarantees that you will pass your air brake ticket first time.

To reduce application pressure to the steering axle brakes during most braking situations.

Reduced pressure to the steer axle brakes occurs for most braking applications.

Only during hard braking is there equivalent pressure delivered to both the front and rear brakes.

Up to a 40psi (275kPa) service brake application, the air pressure delivered to the steer axle brakes is 50%.

During emergency braking (high application pressure 60-70psi (414-482kPa) braking, full application pressure is delivered to the steering axle.

During emergency braking of more than 20psi (130kPa), it is imperative that you have your seat belt fastened, otherwise you are going to be doing a “bug impression” on the inside of the windshield.

Questions on test: At what pressure is there equal braking to the front and rear brakes?

60psi (414kPa)

The one-way check valve is primary responsible for the division of the air brake system into a primary and secondary sub-system.A cattle chute with one-way gates allows the cows to only move in one direction – forward.

A one-way check valve in an air brake system works exactly the same – it allows air to only move in one direction – forward through the system.

The one-way check valves are located at the entrance of the primary and secondary air tanks, and these are a major fail-safe of the air brake system.

These are required to be checked as part of the driver's pre-trip inspection.


As well, there is one located at the trailer air tank.

The one-way check valves at the entrance of the primary and secondary tanks are primarily responsible for dividing the system into two independent subsystems.

If there is a leak in either subsystem, the one-way check valves prevent air from bleeding out from the subsystem that still maintains air pressure.

To keep the parking brakes off, the two-way check valve is designed to pull air from the system with the higher pressure; therefore, the spring parking brakes will not apply automatically in the event that one of the subsystems fails.

Air Brakes Explained Simply is a revolutionary CDL Air Brake manual that guarantees that you will pass your CDL Air Brake Test...First Time.

Air Brakes Explained Simply is a revolutionary air-brake manual for American truck, bus, RV, and semi-trailer drivers.

Highly technical information is presented in clear, easy-to-read format

This e-Book contains everything you need to know to pass your Commercial Driver’s License (CDL)


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